Chris Thilk
John Mellencamp will release his 22nd full-length album, Plain Spoken, on September 23. After a four-year hiatus, Mellancamp has marked his return with an elegant and soul-searching album that finds him questioning life, authority and his beliefs. Now, TIME is pleased to premiere the video for the album’s lead single “Troubled Man,” an acoustic-guitar driven charmer.

Watch John Mellencamp’s Video for “Troubled Man”: Premiere | TIME

I love John Mellencamp more and more as he settles into his role as Cranky Uncle In Chief.

This is the way of things with prequels: They trade on the totemic. If there’s a catchphrase or a weapon or an article of clothing that the hero of an older movie series is known for, prequels build to the scene where the character uses one of the above for the first time. Or they make a joke about how the character is not going to use it—a joke that only people who know the franchise will get. (via The problem with prequels / The Dissolve)

This is the way of things with prequels: They trade on the totemic. If there’s a catchphrase or a weapon or an article of clothing that the hero of an older movie series is known for, prequels build to the scene where the character uses one of the above for the first time. Or they make a joke about how the character is not going to use it—a joke that only people who know the franchise will get. (via The problem with prequels / The Dissolve)

I liked the new Ryan Adams album a *lot* more than I thought I would and songs like this are a big reason why. 

In three years, U.S. astronauts will no longer be dependent on Vladimir Putin’s space program for rides to the International Space Station. The new all-American space taxis will be made by Boeing (BA) and Elon Musk’s SpaceX. The $6.8 billion in commercial contracts awarded by NASA on Tuesday will fund the first vehicles for U.S. astronauts that won’t be designed and built by the federal government. The program is also intended to spark America’s commercial space-flight industry and lay the groundwork for NASA’s future deep-space exploration and a manned journey to Mars. (via Blasting Off Without Putin: NASA Orders Ships From Boeing, SpaceX - Businessweek)

This is super-exciting.

In three years, U.S. astronauts will no longer be dependent on Vladimir Putin’s space program for rides to the International Space Station. The new all-American space taxis will be made by Boeing (BA) and Elon Musk’s SpaceX. The $6.8 billion in commercial contracts awarded by NASA on Tuesday will fund the first vehicles for U.S. astronauts that won’t be designed and built by the federal government. The program is also intended to spark America’s commercial space-flight industry and lay the groundwork for NASA’s future deep-space exploration and a manned journey to Mars. (via Blasting Off Without Putin: NASA Orders Ships From Boeing, SpaceX - Businessweek)

This is super-exciting.

They found that on a typical weeknight, a quarter of American workers did some kind of work between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. That’s a lot, compared with about seven percent in France and the Netherlands. The U.K. is closest to the U.S. on this measure, where 19 percent work during night hours. On the weekends, one in three workers in the U.S. were on the job, compared to one in five in France, Germany, and the Netherlands.
When Disney announced that it was releasing a new Star Wars trilogy, many fans, understandably, pumped their hands in the air and yelled “Nooooo!” What was once a cool Hollywood maverick of a saga had already been brand-extended nearly past recognition: first with the CGI-“enhanced” versions of the originals in the ‘90s, then the Jar Jar Binks-addled prequels, followed by the 3-D theatrical re-releases and a critically-panned animated movie. So it was totally valid to suspect that along with Lucasfilm’s holdings and rights (those went to Disney for $4.05 billion), the franchise had also, finally, sold its soul. But in the two years since, skepticism has given way to optimistic speculation and hype about the new sequels, the first of which is set for a December 2015 release. And a novel paradox has emerged: What the new Star Wars is selling is its original soul. (via Selling the Soul of Star Wars - The Atlantic)

When Disney announced that it was releasing a new Star Wars trilogy, many fans, understandably, pumped their hands in the air and yelled “Nooooo!” What was once a cool Hollywood maverick of a saga had already been brand-extended nearly past recognition: first with the CGI-“enhanced” versions of the originals in the ‘90s, then the Jar Jar Binks-addled prequels, followed by the 3-D theatrical re-releases and a critically-panned animated movie. So it was totally valid to suspect that along with Lucasfilm’s holdings and rights (those went to Disney for $4.05 billion), the franchise had also, finally, sold its soul. But in the two years since, skepticism has given way to optimistic speculation and hype about the new sequels, the first of which is set for a December 2015 release. And a novel paradox has emerged: What the new Star Wars is selling is its original soul. (via Selling the Soul of Star Wars - The Atlantic)

Four decades after Rush put out their self-titled debut, the trio is celebrating its legacy with a box set that collects concert films from their entire career. The 10-DVD or six-Blu-ray set R40, set for release on November 11th, compiles the previously released concert videos Rush in Rio (2003), R30 (2005), Snakes & Arrows Live (2008), Time Machine 2011: Time in Cleveland (2011) and Clockwork Angels Tour (2013), as well as a bonus disc with previously unreleased live performances. The box set also contains a 52-page hardback book, including photos of memorabilia and from concerts throughout their career. (via Rush to Celebrate 40th Anniversary With Live Box Set | Rolling Stone)

The Rush in Rio album is not that great - it’s got a really bad mix that makes it unlistenable for me - but the 2011 Time Machine record is soooo goooood.

Four decades after Rush put out their self-titled debut, the trio is celebrating its legacy with a box set that collects concert films from their entire career. The 10-DVD or six-Blu-ray set R40, set for release on November 11th, compiles the previously released concert videos Rush in Rio (2003), R30 (2005), Snakes & Arrows Live (2008), Time Machine 2011: Time in Cleveland (2011) and Clockwork Angels Tour (2013), as well as a bonus disc with previously unreleased live performances. The box set also contains a 52-page hardback book, including photos of memorabilia and from concerts throughout their career. (via Rush to Celebrate 40th Anniversary With Live Box Set | Rolling Stone)

The Rush in Rio album is not that great - it’s got a really bad mix that makes it unlistenable for me - but the 2011 Time Machine record is soooo goooood.

This finding held true no matter how much they consumed, nor how confident they were that their comfort food would be particularly effective. Belief in such foods’ power is extremely widespread: After listing their favorites, 81 percent of participants either agreed, or strongly agreed, with the statement “I am confident that eating this food would make me feel better.” These findings have obvious implications for diet and weight loss. “We found no justification for people to choose comfort foods when they are distressed,” the researchers conclude. “Removing an excuse for eating a high-calorie or high-fat food may help people develop and maintain healthier eating habits, and may lead them to focus on other, food-free methods of improving their mood.” In other words, we’ve just lost yet another rationalization for eating junk. That’s awfully distressing, but it’s good to know the feeling will pass—with or without the help of a Hershey’s bar. (via Study: Comfort Food Is a Myth - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society)

This finding held true no matter how much they consumed, nor how confident they were that their comfort food would be particularly effective. Belief in such foods’ power is extremely widespread: After listing their favorites, 81 percent of participants either agreed, or strongly agreed, with the statement “I am confident that eating this food would make me feel better.” These findings have obvious implications for diet and weight loss. “We found no justification for people to choose comfort foods when they are distressed,” the researchers conclude. “Removing an excuse for eating a high-calorie or high-fat food may help people develop and maintain healthier eating habits, and may lead them to focus on other, food-free methods of improving their mood.” In other words, we’ve just lost yet another rationalization for eating junk. That’s awfully distressing, but it’s good to know the feeling will pass—with or without the help of a Hershey’s bar. (via Study: Comfort Food Is a Myth - Pacific Standard: The Science of Society)

These are not the staid holes which define the dreary, predictable Euro-style putt putt courses, which are ruled by trigonometric geniuses. The American, adventure-style miniature golf game trades such obvious nuances in strategy for, well, adventure. Melodramatic, baroque, bordering on pornographic, with themes like pirates, Polynesia, and prehistory. The courses wind through air conditioned volcanoes or Mayan step pyramids or the rolling hills of Eden or hysterically faux-realistic landscapes of grass green carpeting and water that runs an electric shade of blue—both too blue and too green for anywhere but an adventure golf course. This is the aesthetic of Hawaiian Rumble and its owner, Bob Detwiler.
theavc:

Pop has become the black sheep of U2’s catalog, and that’s a shame. 

Reblog because the other day I was listening to the entire U2 catalog (oblivious to the fact that two days later a new album would suddenly appear) and was struck by how much I like this record. As the article says, in some ways it’s aged better than some of their releases since. 

theavc:

Pop has become the black sheep of U2’s catalog, and that’s a shame.

Reblog because the other day I was listening to the entire U2 catalog (oblivious to the fact that two days later a new album would suddenly appear) and was struck by how much I like this record. As the article says, in some ways it’s aged better than some of their releases since.