Chris Thilk
Last month, NASA said it would pay SpaceX its largest single contract ever, $2.6 billion, to shuttle US astronauts up to the International Space Station (ISS). It’s one of two companies that will build vehicles to replace the discontinued space shuttle and return the US to the list of spacefaring nations. The other, SpaceX’s frequently testy competitor Boeing, will do the same job but at more than half again the cost—some $4.2 billion.
In fact, SpaceX has a chance at beating the aerospace giant to be the first private company to fly humans into orbit. This is an enormous milestone for the firm, and also its most dangerous task so far. But building cost-effective space vehicles gives SpaceX a chance to save US space efforts from their own torpor. (via What it took for Elon Musk’s SpaceX to disrupt Boeing, leapfrog NASA, and become a serious space company - Quartz)

Last month, NASA said it would pay SpaceX its largest single contract ever, $2.6 billion, to shuttle US astronauts up to the International Space Station (ISS). It’s one of two companies that will build vehicles to replace the discontinued space shuttle and return the US to the list of spacefaring nations. The other, SpaceX’s frequently testy competitor Boeing, will do the same job but at more than half again the cost—some $4.2 billion.
In fact, SpaceX has a chance at beating the aerospace giant to be the first private company to fly humans into orbit. This is an enormous milestone for the firm, and also its most dangerous task so far. But building cost-effective space vehicles gives SpaceX a chance to save US space efforts from their own torpor. (via What it took for Elon Musk’s SpaceX to disrupt Boeing, leapfrog NASA, and become a serious space company - Quartz)

Keaton always kept madness in his arsenal. In Mr. Mom, he ends up talking to himself, driven crazy by the then-outrageous idea of a man acting as a homemaker while his wife worked. In Clean And Sober, he’s a drug and alcohol abuser driven to destructive behavior by his addictions. In Pacific Heights, he’s a murderous tenant. And in The Dream Team, he plays an mental patient, suffering from a mostly harmless sort of twinkly movie madness, but an unwell man nonetheless. For Tim Burton, he made Beetlejuice an unpredictable engine of chaos, and Bruce Wayne a hero driven as much by his own instability as a desire for justice. Anger and revenge provide the motives for Christian Bale’s Batman; Keaton’s Batman has trained and armored himself, but remains a hurt kid inside. When the staff of the Gotham Globe chose the headline “Winged Freak Terrorizes Gotham’s Gangland,” they were closer to the truth than they realized. (via The irreducible element of Michael Keaton / The Dissolve)

Keaton always kept madness in his arsenal. In Mr. Mom, he ends up talking to himself, driven crazy by the then-outrageous idea of a man acting as a homemaker while his wife worked. In Clean And Sober, he’s a drug and alcohol abuser driven to destructive behavior by his addictions. In Pacific Heights, he’s a murderous tenant. And in The Dream Team, he plays an mental patient, suffering from a mostly harmless sort of twinkly movie madness, but an unwell man nonetheless. For Tim Burton, he made Beetlejuice an unpredictable engine of chaos, and Bruce Wayne a hero driven as much by his own instability as a desire for justice. Anger and revenge provide the motives for Christian Bale’s Batman; Keaton’s Batman has trained and armored himself, but remains a hurt kid inside. When the staff of the Gotham Globe chose the headline “Winged Freak Terrorizes Gotham’s Gangland,” they were closer to the truth than they realized. (via The irreducible element of Michael Keaton / The Dissolve)

siphotos:

Michael Jordan soars on his way to the Slam Dunk title during the 1988 NBA All-Star Weekend.  (Walter Iooss Jr./SI)
GALLERY: The 10 Most Entertaining NBA Players of All Time

Reblog because let’s just be honest, no one has, does or ever will move like Jordan. 

siphotos:

Michael Jordan soars on his way to the Slam Dunk title during the 1988 NBA All-Star Weekend.  (Walter Iooss Jr./SI)

GALLERY: The 10 Most Entertaining NBA Players of All Time

Reblog because let’s just be honest, no one has, does or ever will move like Jordan. 

The One Ring has many powers, but considering it’s a) a ring and b) made of nigh-invulnerable magical gold, it’s not the easiest thing to rest your weary Hobbit-head on. This adorable version of it solves all of those problems (with none of the magic, of course)! (via One Lord of the Rings Pillow to Rule Them All)

The One Ring has many powers, but considering it’s a) a ring and b) made of nigh-invulnerable magical gold, it’s not the easiest thing to rest your weary Hobbit-head on. This adorable version of it solves all of those problems (with none of the magic, of course)! (via One Lord of the Rings Pillow to Rule Them All)

Evernote’s office products are a brilliant form of content marketing

Evernote’s office products are a brilliant form of content marketing

I’ll admit that, while I haven’t bought any of them yet, I love the look of Evernote’s line of deck accessories. The simple lines, the look of the wood…for someone who has a weird thing about desk and other organizational items to begin with (going to The Container Store, something Robin Phillips just wrote about, used to be akin to going to Borders for me) these are the epitome of being right up…

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See if you can see why, while watching this video this video, I came to the realization that YouTube may not be the best option for either breaking news or time-senstive sales/promotions. 

See if you can see why, while watching this video this video, I came to the realization that YouTube may not be the best option for either breaking news or time-senstive sales/promotions. 

In response to the lawsuit, the city issued subpoenas against five pastors in the Houston area, requiring that they turn over “all speeches, presentations, or sermons related to HERO, the Petition, Mayor Annise Parker, homosexuality, or gender identity prepared by, delivered by, revised by, or approved by you or in your possession.” Officials want to find out if and how pastors might have instructed opponents to collect signatures. As New York Magazine’s Kate Zavadski says, “What exactly the pastors said, and what the collectors knew about the rules, is one of the key issues in pending litigation around whether opponents of the law gathered enough signatures for a referendum.”

Houston told pastors to hand over their sermons for an investigation. Is that legal? - Vox

I’m not usually a “slippery slope” type of person, but yikes.

In the two decades since Dave Winer more or less invented the genre, blogging has been through the usual internet hype cycle: lauded breathlessly as the new, new thing; rapidly taken up until it reaches a peak after which boredom sets in and the quest for the next new thing begins. At the moment the crazes are microblogging – twittering – and ephemeral communications such as Snapchat, but these too will pass. And when they do, people will suddenly rediscover that some of the most interesting writing, thinking and discussion in the world still goes on in the wilds of the blogosphere, far away from the big-name media brands and online publications. They will rediscover Crooked Timber, or the astonishing Becker-Posner blog, in which a Nobel laureate and a distinguished American judge exchange beautifully crafted arguments about big subjects on a daily basis. Or they will visit Light Blue Touchpaper to find out what Cambridge’s computer security researchers are thinking about, or Freedom to Tinker in which their counterparts in Princeton are doing the same. And if they tire of that, they can always visit Larry Lessig’s blog to follow his campaign against corruption in US political life, or Doc Searl’s amazing weblog in which he manages to write interestingly on just about anything. And so on and so on. It would be absurd to claim that this cornucopia of riches is all down to Dave Winer, but when the history of the web is written, his name will be up there in lights, because he was the guy who showed what blogging could do. And I, for one, hope that he will still be doing it in 2034. (via Happy 20th anniversary to Dave Winer – inventor of the blog | Technology | The Observer)

In the two decades since Dave Winer more or less invented the genre, blogging has been through the usual internet hype cycle: lauded breathlessly as the new, new thing; rapidly taken up until it reaches a peak after which boredom sets in and the quest for the next new thing begins. At the moment the crazes are microblogging – twittering – and ephemeral communications such as Snapchat, but these too will pass. And when they do, people will suddenly rediscover that some of the most interesting writing, thinking and discussion in the world still goes on in the wilds of the blogosphere, far away from the big-name media brands and online publications. They will rediscover Crooked Timber, or the astonishing Becker-Posner blog, in which a Nobel laureate and a distinguished American judge exchange beautifully crafted arguments about big subjects on a daily basis. Or they will visit Light Blue Touchpaper to find out what Cambridge’s computer security researchers are thinking about, or Freedom to Tinker in which their counterparts in Princeton are doing the same. And if they tire of that, they can always visit Larry Lessig’s blog to follow his campaign against corruption in US political life, or Doc Searl’s amazing weblog in which he manages to write interestingly on just about anything. And so on and so on. It would be absurd to claim that this cornucopia of riches is all down to Dave Winer, but when the history of the web is written, his name will be up there in lights, because he was the guy who showed what blogging could do. And I, for one, hope that he will still be doing it in 2034. (via Happy 20th anniversary to Dave Winer – inventor of the blog | Technology | The Observer)

nprfreshair:

"I think there are two primary jobs that a jacket has to do: It has to represent a text and it has to sell it. In a way, a book jacket … is sort of like a title that an author comes up with. It’s one thing that has to speak to a big aggregate thing, which is the book itself. And it has to be compelling in some way such that you’re interested enough to pick it up — and perhaps buy it. … It’s like a billboard or an advertisement or a movie trailer or a teaser. …

I think of a book jacket as being sort of like a visual reminder of the book, but … it’s also a souvenir of the reading experience. Reading takes place in this nebulous kind of realm, and in a way, the jacket is part of the thing that you bring back from that experience. It’s the thing that you hold on to.”

- Peter Mendelsund, book jacket designer 

The Jacket Designer’s Challenge: To Capture A Book By Its Cover

Reblog because this is just great.