Chris Thilk
On Sept. 1, 1939, one week after Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed a non-aggression pact, more than a million German troops—along with 50,000 Slovakian soldiers—invaded Poland. Two weeks later, a half-million Russian troops attacked Poland from the east. After years of vague rumblings, explicit threats and open conjecture about the likelihood of a global conflict—in Europe, the Pacific and beyond—the Second World War had begun. (via World War II Erupts: Color Photos From the Invasion of Poland, 1939 | LIFE.com)

On Sept. 1, 1939, one week after Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed a non-aggression pact, more than a million German troops—along with 50,000 Slovakian soldiers—invaded Poland. Two weeks later, a half-million Russian troops attacked Poland from the east. After years of vague rumblings, explicit threats and open conjecture about the likelihood of a global conflict—in Europe, the Pacific and beyond—the Second World War had begun. (via World War II Erupts: Color Photos From the Invasion of Poland, 1939 | LIFE.com)

Nathan Feist, the Fawlty Towers fan who built the reproduction, honored the show in such meticulous detail that even small things like fire extinguishers were reproduced in LEGO form. And have you ever seen a LEGO moose? Well, look no further. The famous moose head from the show is up in glorious detail, broken antler and all, on the wall above the reception desk. (via Don’t Be Alarmed… It’s Only a FAWLTY TOWERS LEGO Recreation « Nerdist)

Nathan Feist, the Fawlty Towers fan who built the reproduction, honored the show in such meticulous detail that even small things like fire extinguishers were reproduced in LEGO form. And have you ever seen a LEGO moose? Well, look no further. The famous moose head from the show is up in glorious detail, broken antler and all, on the wall above the reception desk. (via Don’t Be Alarmed… It’s Only a FAWLTY TOWERS LEGO Recreation « Nerdist)

Let me start with an example from the pre-Internet press. As the historian Robert Darnton recalls from his time as a staff writer at The New York Times in the 1960s, “We really wrote for one another. […] We knew that no one would jump on our stories as quickly as our colleagues.” Darnton reminds us that, in the printed world, the quality of one’s articles was mostly assessed by one’s peers and superiors. Journalists had somewhat abstract representations of their reading public. The “letters to the editor” were often left unread. Then came the Internet. Journalists adjusted to this technological shock, inventing new practices and reconfiguring others (and in some cases changing nothing). Among the most profound changes differentiating print and online news was the arrival of web metrics. Journalists started to receive detailed feedback from their reading public. Editors began to track in real-time the number of clicks, uniques, likes, and tweets. Editorial departments increasingly relied on web analytics. One of the most popular analytics programs, Chartbeat, is now used by more than 3,000 sites in 35 countries. This irruption of web metrics in editorial practice did not go unnoticed.

bonniegrrl:

Shiny! ‘Firefly’ crew gets its own Funko toys!

Captain Mal Reynolds, Jayne Cobb, Kaylee, Wash and Zoe from the hit show “Firefly” aim to misbehave with these cute Funko Pop vinyl figures.

Find out more in my latest article for CNET.

Reblog because I just can’t wrap my head around how much I need these. 

Social media, like Twitter and Facebook, has the effect of tamping down diversity of opinion and stifling debate about public affairs. It makes people less likely to voice opinions, particularly when they think their views differ from those of their friends, according to a report published Tuesday by researchers at Pew Research Center and Rutgers University.

How Social Media Silences Debate - NYTimes.com

I don’t question the results of the survey, but isn’t “keeping some of your opinions to yourself” a pretty common thing both on and offline? More importantly, isn’t that the basis for civilizations being able to actually flourish? Jerks who are openly mad at each other over social issues don’t build bridges, schools or anything else.

The same people saying click-bait is a problem are the ones clicking on that bait

Facebook tries to clean up problem it created

facebook_logo.pngI was going to write something really profound about Facebook’s announcement that it was cracking down on “click bait” type stories, penalizing them the News Feed algorithm based on a number of factors, but then Dave Coustan wrote this and why bother. See his post for how this is likely to impact brand and other publishers.

The question I keep asking, though, is how did Facebook ultimately decide…

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We just maxed out our ecological budget for 2014. For the rest of the year, we’ll be living in deficit to the environment, consuming more natural resources than the planet can regenerate. For the record, the exact date that we reached the limit was August 19. In 2013, “Earth Overshoot Day” fell on August 20 (see here), and the date has been getting earlier ever since the mid-1970s, when we first went into the red. It was October 21 in 1993, and early October by the 2000s.
(via Meet the Pfeiffer Collection - Evernote Blog)

As someone with a weird thing for office organization systems, these are making me drool all over my keyboard.

(via Meet the Pfeiffer Collection - Evernote Blog)

As someone with a weird thing for office organization systems, these are making me drool all over my keyboard.

I guess what I’m saying is that this music that I’ve been so interested in for a good number of years now allows for a greater depth and variety of expression. If I’m singing a song that I’ve written about the snake-handling congregations of Appalachia, and it’s sort of a bluesy boogie piece, I could just play the standard sort of blues-based music in the right hand. But I feel like that’s a little straight, and goes down a little too easy. So I use that as an excuse to [include] these pieces. The Webern piece, which is very pointillistic, and the Carter piece, which is atonal and sort of a perpetual-motion piece — they feel to me like they’re evocative of the lyrics, evocative of the scene I’m painting with the words.

Bruce Hornsby’s Modern Classical Moment : NPR

This is why I’m such a Bruce Hornsby fan. While I love his early records with The Range, his stuff since then is next-level awesome.

The Ice Bucket Challenge is the gift that keeps on giving for the ALS Association. The organization raised more than $10 million on Thursday alone, it said, bringing its total haul since July 29 to $53 million. For comparison’s sake, the group raised $2.2 million during the same period last year. The contributions, which have come from more than 1 million new donors as well as some old donors, are an enormous boon for the ALS Association, whose national office raised only $19 million in all of 2012.